A scope of work is an absolute necessity when getting a quote from contractors. It is all the detail that usually isn’t included in your plans. Think of it this way: Your architectural plans will show where a light switch goes, but it won’t tell you what kind of light switch it is…a regular light switch will cost you about 89 cents, a dimmer might cost you $15, and a Wi-Fi enabled switch will cost you around $50…extrapolate that over 50 or 60 light switches and this could be a huge difference in numbers. Better to get the correct pricing up front.

This is my EXACT SOW that I sent out to the contractors that bid my job. Take it, copy it, use it, alter it! Hope it helps you.


Exactly what it sounds like…these are the architect’s plans with all my notes integrated that I approved to go out to my contractors for bid. This is one set shy of the set that we submit to the building department, which is known as the CD set, or Construction Drawings set. The CDs will take into account any changes in scope I have made throughout the bid process adding or removing items that I discuss with my GC and what my overall budget can tolerate.


These are my plans that I developed and drew in Chief Architect. This is the latest iteration, but I went through many layouts and configurations before I landed on this. This is what I gave to my architect to work from. To be clear, this is not a necessity, but as a design professional this saved me a lot of money with my architect because he could clearly see what I wanted to accomplish and didn’t have to iterate at all…I did all the iterating on my own.


Second set of notes I gave to my architect on things that I wanted changed on the plans. You can see me working on these in the Bid Package episode of the Vlog.


First set of notes I gave to my architect on things that I wanted changed on the plans. You can see me working on these in the Bid Package episode of the Vlog.